Fermented Veggies, Fruits, etc..

Recipes from Nourishing Traditions Cookbook by Sally Fallon and Mary Enig

 

 Sauerkraut   (page 92)

1  medium cabbage, cored and shredded

1  TBSP caraway seeds

1  TBSP sea salt

4  TBSP whey  (page 87)  (if not available, use an additional 1 TBSP salt)

In a bowl, mix cabbage with caraway seeds, sea salt and whey.  Pound with a wooden pounder or a meat hammer for about 10 minutes to release juices  (I prefer to squeeze and ‘massage’ the mixture in my hands – I feel it works faster and is a ‘kinder’ method too).   Place in a quart-sized, wide-mouth mason jar and press down firmly with a pounder or meat hammer until juices come to the top of the cabbage.  The top of the cabbage should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for about 3 days before transferring to cold storage.  The sauerkraut may be eaten immediately, but it improves with age.  Makes 1 quart.

Experiment with different vegetables to make your own delicious kimchee.  The deep magenta colored one we served on June 6 was made with green cabbage, red cabbage, beets, carrots, and daikon radish.  The lighter pink colored one did not have the beets in it but included onion, fresh ginger and garlic.  (I usually omit the caraway seeds when I make anything other than plain sauerkraut – but that’s just me).

I believe in the book, “Wild Fermentation”, Sandor recommends keeping the cabbage amount for the total vegetables used at about 60%.

Other than that, I follow Sally’s recipe, multiplying the whey and salt depending on the overall volume of veggies.

 

Ginger Carrots

4 cups grated carrots, tightly packed

1 TBSP freshly grated ginger

1 TBSP sea salt

4 TBSP whey

These are the best introduction to lacto-fermented vegetables we know: the taste is delicious; and the sweetness of the carrots neutralizes the acidity that some people find disagreeable when they are first introduced to lacto-fermented vegetables.  Ginger carrots go well with rich foods and spicy meats.

In a bowl, mix all ingredients and pound with a wooden pounder or a meat hammer (or massage and squeeze with your hands) to release juices.  Place in a quart-sized, wide-mouth mason jar and press down firmly until juices cover the carrots.  The top of the carrots should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar.  Cover tightly and leave at room temperature about 3 days before transferring to cold storage.

 

Fruit Chutney ~~ Makes 1 Quart

3 cups fresh peaches, pears, apples, mango or papaya
1/2 cup filtered water
grated rind of 2 lemons
1/8 cup Rapadura
2 tsp. sea salt
1/4 cup whey
1/2 cup crispy pecans, chopped
1/2 cup dark raisons or currants
1 tsp ground cumin
1/4 to 1/2 tsp red pepper flakes
1/2 tsp thyme
1 tsp fennel seeds
1 tsp coriander seeds

Mix water, lemon juice, lemon rind, Rapadura, salt and whey.  Peel fruit and cut up into lemon juice mixture.  Mix with nuts, raisons, herbs and spices and place in a quart-sized, wide-mouth mason jar.  Press down lightly with a wooden pounder or a meat hammer, adding more water if necessary to cover the fruit.  The mixture should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar.  Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for 2 days before transferring to refrigerator.

This should be eaten within 2 months.

 

Corn Relish 

3 cups fresh corn kernels

1 small tomato, peeled, seeded and diced

1 small onion, finely diced

½  red pepper, seeded and diced

2 Tbsp cilantro leaves, chopped

¼ – ½ Tsp red pepper flakes

1 Tbsp. sea salt

4 Tbsp whey

In a large bowl mix all ingredients.  Pound lightly with a wooden pounder or a meat hammer to release juices.  Place in a quart-sized, wide-mouth mason jar and press down until juices cover the relish.  The top of the vegetables should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar.  Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for about 3 days before transferring to cold storage.

 

Raisin Chutney

3 cups raisins, soaked in warm water for 1 hour

4 cloves garlic, peeled and coarsely chopped

1 bunch cilantro, stem removed

20 black peppercorns

1/2 tsp red pepper flakes

2 tbsp coriander seeds

1 tbsp cumin seeds

1 tbsp anise seeds

1 tbsp freshly grated ginger

2 tsp sea salt

1/4 cup whey

1 cup filtered water

Place garlic and cilantro in food processor and pulse a few times.  Drain raisins and add to food processor along with peppercorns, red pepper flakes, seeds and ginger.  Pulse a few times until the mixture becomes a coarse paste.  Transfer to a quart-sized, wide-mouth mason jar and press down lightly with a wooden pounder or meat hammer.  Mix salt and whey with water and pour into jar.  You may need to poke a few homes in the chutney to allow liquid to percolate through.  Add more water if necessary to cover the chutney.  The top of the chutney should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar.  Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for about 2 days before transferring to refrigerator.  The chutney should be eaten within 2 months.

Personal Note:  I add the water and sea salt in the procesoor along with the ingredients.  Then I pour the mixture into a bowl and evenly stir in the whey….Then transfer to quart jar.

 

Beet Kvass

3 medium or 2 large organic beets, peeled and chopped up coursely

1/4 cup whey

1 TBSP sea salt

filtered water

This drink is valuable for its medicinal qualities and as a digestive aid.  Beets are just loaded with nutrients.  One 4-ounce glass, morning and night, is an excellent blood tonic, promotes regulariy, aids digestion, alkalizes the blood, cleanses the liver and is a good treatment for kidney stones and other ailments.  Beet kvass may also be used in place of vinegar in salad dressings and as an addition to soups.

Place beets, whey and salt in a 2-quart glass container.  Add filtered water to fill the container.  Stir well and cover securely.  Keep at room temperature for 2 days before transferring to refrigerator.

When most of the liquid has been drunk, you may fill up the container with water and keep at room temperature another 2 days.  The resulting brew will be slightly less strong than the first.  After the second brew, discard the beets and start again.  You may, however, reserve some of the liquid and use this as your inoculant instead of the whey.

Note:  Do not use grated beets in the preparation of beet tonic.  When grated, beets exude too much juice resulting in a too rapid frementation that favors the production of alcohol rather than lactic acid.

 

Kefir

2 cups fresh whole milk, non-homogenized and preferably raw.  (I use a quart of milk)

½ cup good quality cream (optional)

1 Tbsp kefir grains or 1 package kefir powder

If using kefir grains, place them in a fine strainer and rinse with filtered water.  Place milk and optional cream in a clean wide-mouth, quart-size mason jar.  If milk is cold, place jar in a pan of simmering water intul milk reaches room temperature.  Add kefir grains or powder to milk, stir well and cover loosely with a cloth.  Place in a warm place (65 to 76) degrees) for 12 hours to 2 days.

If using the powder, kefir is ready when it thickens, usually within 24 hours.

If using grains, stir vigorously occasionally to redistribute the grains.  Every time you stir, taste the kefir.  When it achieves a tartness to your liking, the kefir is ready.  The kefir may also become thick and effervescent, depending on the temperature, incubation time and the amount of curds you use.  Pour the kefir through a strainer into another jar to remove the gains.  Store in a refrigerator.  Use the grains to make another batch of kefir, or prepare them for storage by rinsing them well with water and placing in a small jar with about ½ cup filtered water.  They may be stored in the refrigerator several weeks or in the freezer for several months.  If they are left too long in storage, they will lose their culturing power.

 

Kombucha

 3 quarts filtered water

1 cup sugar

4 tea bags of organic black tea

½ cup kombucha from a previous culture

1 kombucha mushroom

Bring 3 quarts filtered water to boil.  Add sugar and simmer until dissolved.  Remove from heat, add the tea bags and allow the tea to steep until water has completely cooled.  Remove tea bags.  Pour cooled liquid into a 4-quart pyrex bowl and add 1/ cup kombucha from previous batch.  Place the mushroom on top of the liquid.  Make a crisscross over the bowl with masking tape, cover loosely with a cloth or towel and transfer to a warm, dark place, away from contaminants and insects.  In about 7 to 10 days the kombucha will be ready, depending on the temperature.  It should be rather sour and possibly fizzy, with no taste of tea remaining.  Transfer to covered glass containers and store in the refrigerator.  (Note: Do not wash kombucha bowls in the dishwasher).

When the kombucha is ready, your mushroom will have grown a second spongy pancake.  This can be used to make other batches or given away to friends.  Store fresh mushrooms in the refrigerator in a glass or stainless container – never plastic.  A kombucha mushroom can be used dozens of times.  If it begins to turn black, or if the resulting kombucha doesn’t sour properly, it’s a sign that the culture has become contaminated.  When this happens, it’s best to throw away all your mushrooms and order a new clean one.

Note:  White sugar, rather than honey or Rapadura, and black tea, rather than flavored teas, give the highest amounts of glucuronic acid.  Non-organic tea is high in fluoride so always use organic tea.

A word of caution:  some individuals may have an allergic reaction to kombucha.  If you have allergies, start with a small taste to observe any adverse effects.  If you react badly, use beet kvass several weeks to detoxify and then try again.